With the European population growing older, the challenge is to keep an increasing number of seniors across all European countries healthy and active. In Europe, between 13.5 % and 29.7 % of older adults living at home are malnourished or at risk of protein energy malnutrition. PROMISS aims to better understand and ultimately prevent protein energy malnutrition in seniors. Thereby, PROMISS will contribute to improve active and healthy ageing.

Project information

Nutrition for healthy ageing

News

4th May 2018

PROMISS Newsletter #2 – February 2018

Malnutrition is a critical issue, with a direct impact on older people’s quality of life. In Europe alone, about one out of 5 older people living at home is malnourished or at risk of malnutrition.

Preventing malnutrition is urgent for the whole society, for older generations of today as well as those of tomorrow.

In this newsletter:

  • A sneak peek of PROMISS research (pages 2-5):
  • The power of microbiota
  • The work on the accelerometer
  • Findings of the most prominent longitudinal ageing studies in the field of nutrition

 

  • Nutrition and appetite in older people (page 6):
  • Preliminary research results show what is relevant for seniors

 

  • What comes next? (page 7)
  • Read about what keeps our team busy in the coming months

Fighting the malnutrition cascade

Healthcare and communications professionals will bring PROMISS-results to the older adults

The world is facing a situation without precedent: we will soon have more older people than children, and more people at very
old age than ever before. When looking at nutrition in old age, it strikes that more than 90 % of older people in Europe are living at home, and a very poor appetite is reported by 10–15 % of them, which, consequentially, causes malnutrition, and a ‘cascade’ of deteriorated body functions and illnesses; muscle loss, cognitive decline, weak immune systems and slowed wound healing.

The PROMISS project intends to tackle malnutrition, and Professor Marjolein Visser from Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam explains that, in order to design concrete and tailored solutions, optimal protein intake combined with physical activity at certain time points release extra positive effects on ageing. We should however not be left alone in improving our nutrition: the support by healthcare professionals is key.

Discover more in the extensive article, appeared in the BIOECONOMY INNOVATION – COMMBEBIZ MAGAZINE 2017-2018

31st March 2018

Press Release

Press Release – March 2018

Across Europe, one out of five older adults living at home is malnourished, or at risk of protein-energy malnutrition. Improving protein intake might prevent malnutrition.

Many older persons today do not meet the current Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) of protein intake, which may lead to mobility limitations, loss of muscle strength, and increases the risks of chronic protein-energy malnutrition. There is increasing evidence that adequate protein intake is crucial in old age, which makes recognition of low protein intake key, and interventions to prevent malnutrition essential.

These are the issues at the core of the PROMISS research, and you can read about this in our first press release.

View all news

Tweets

[rotatingtweets screen_name=’PROMISS_VU’ include_rts=’3′ tweet_count=’5′ timeout=’2000′]

See all tweets